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  1. Finally getting to do the ground floor. Sheetrock, plaster and paint Workshop done Time to make other things..
    4 points
  2. Time to get some serious work done. 2 days to frame the ground floor. Third day the trusses came and was hoisted up. Then the first floor was done and the rest of the job was mine.... First the floor upstairs And then to get the sides covered, and the roof laid with tongue and groove panels. After this job, I hated shingle 🤣
    2 points
  3. Any connector can be fixed. In some cases I'll eliminate the connector and just splice the wires together, most connectors are there for ease of assembly and never need to be disconnected again. Or you can clean/tighten/replace the terminals as needed. Corrosion at a connector can travel up the wire. If you strip the insulation and the wire is discolored you want to keep cutting 'till you reach clean shiny copper. Sometimes that's impossible without cutting the harness, at that point, if it's not too shitty, I'll treat it with CorrosionX or something similar and let it ride. I
    1 point
  4. I agree Carlos. It's overwhelming. Like if Tammy Faye Baker's makeup artist became an artisan of wood.
    1 point
  5. The original and mosfet both consume all the unneeded current from the stator, basically it's a regulated short circuit to keep the voltage steady. All the extra current being produced by the stator that isn't being consumed by stuff on the bike is consumed by the regulator which creates heat. The mosfet does a better job and might run cooler. A series regulator creates a controlled open circuit instead of short circuit. It 'disconnects' the stator so that there is no extra power being created. Imagine that you had no throttle control so the engine is always running
    1 point
  6. Ha.. You've never ridden a Sportster
    1 point
  7. Sprint 1050 guess it was three sexy nozzles. Always loved the look of that bike.
    1 point
  8. There are multiple issues to consider. Here is a quick shot at a list. A shunt regulator does get very hot , as the power it absorbs can be quite high and increases with RPM. High temperatures do lead to accelerated failure rates in solid state electronics. So putting lower load lighting on your bike actually increases the heat load in the RR unit. Power loss; a permanent magnet alternator with a shunt regulator will always be at maximum load for a given RPM. As the voltage from the stator is directly proportional to RPM, higher revs will mean higher frag on the cranksh
    1 point
  9. looking forward to seeing this put back together. Looks great so far.
    1 point
  10. Come to think of it, I do not remember hearing the fuel pump humming when I attempted starting. No clear signs of corrosion and no burns at the fuel pump connector, but jiggling it worked and got me home. There were no signs of corrosion either on the dreaded factory test plug when that left me stranded, so I'm still thinking that this is the issue at the fuel pump connector. I hoped someone else had experienced and recognized the same problem. I will go through every connector and ground as OMG has suggested. I appreciate the suggestions, advice, and shared experience- I need to r
    1 point
  11. That guy made sure you understood the principle of how things work but could have been done in about 5 minutes. Anything that you are going to use in a emergency setting, should be tried out first like the next time you change tires at home. Man I struggled catching the bead on my front Wing tire last time and that was at home with a big compressor.
    1 point
  12. This is what I have been doing last year and a half Old garage had to go, and it took a week to demolish it 🤩 Then we had to blast a bit, and get the area big enough for the slab Next was to get it ready for concrete. Styrofoam and a lot of rebar work. Making it with a 1,5% slope from back to front for drainage. CONCRETE DAY I'm glad I hired help for this job. 1 week to keep it moist to let it cure Then a bit of foundation for the walls, and ma
    1 point
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