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  1. 3 points
    Flush went well, there was a lot foam in the rear center. Rear brake works better too. Appreciate it 👍
  2. 2 points
    You say "lady" but I wouldn't want to see what is in it. 😀
  3. 2 points
    Anyone want a '99 Service Manual? I haven't had my Blackbird for a few years now and it's time to part ways with it. $5 to cover shipping and it's yours!
  4. 2 points
    Six years ago when my grandson, who lives with us, started seriously thinking about real cars instead of video games. We pulled the covers off so he could see what old iron looked and felt like. We put some air in the circa 1982 model tires. That was probably the last time it was completely uncovered. It is 50 years old now.
  5. 2 points
    After 5-6 coats of candy and 3 coats of clear. I'm very pleased with results but we are not done yet. It will be wet sanded again and cleared with different clear for even more depth. Today I used UC35, final step will be done with UFC35 clear. All products used today are from House of Kolor.
  6. 2 points
    My riding buddy passed last thanksgiving and had a few bikes. All went to family except for this last one. 1986 Kawasaki Ninja 1000R. Bike is clean with 36000 miles. Corbin seat has a tear in it. His wife has started it and it runs fine as far as I know. She's asking $2500. I only have the one pic right now but if theres any interest I will take some more if wanted and try to answer any questions. Thanks guys. Skip
  7. 2 points
    Ya, he has always been a trouble maker. 😁
  8. 2 points
    Yes, but the rest of us take that well. It's what makes us all men and brothers. You give your best friends the most shit. You should see my best friend talk about me sinking a Jeep, and me about always fucking up GFCI installs (he does commercial work with no GFCIs, always gets confused with them.
  9. 2 points
    That kinda looks like a dial indicator, but they only measure linear movement in line with the plunger; what is that thing called? Today I played with the adjustments and might have figured out the solution. The mysterious mechanical clutch actuator is kinda odd and it appears that I just need to make some adjustments/tweaks. The cable is too long to get a proper adjustment without having the adjusters all the way out to where they're falling off the threads, but at that point I was able to get a good release and find neutral. I'll take some measurements using your guy's measurement & photo to confirm, then I'll probably have to have a cable made to the right length. Thank you joblock and blackhawk.
  10. 2 points
    I'm sure most of you already know this but if any of you don't please be advised rockmeupto125 as a really nice guy. Kung Fu aside I wish I could shake his hand and buy him a beer.
  11. 2 points
    My fluids have only been replaced once in 21 years, maybe. Bike has over 50k and probably a thousand passes at the dragstrip. And this was an 1/8th mile with a short shutdown, so you had to use a lot of brake. 8k miles on a 20 years old bike is scary to me, that's why I always say mileage should not be anywhere near the top of a list of requirements for purchase, no matter what it is, and especially not a bird. But don't be like me, change the fluid FIRST and do a full bleed to make sure it's not the easiest fix of all. The easiest thing to check of hard parts is the caliper. Center stand, put in first gear, get the rear wheel speed up to maybe 20-30mph, clutch in and hit rear brake. Rear wheel should stop almost immediately. If not, pull the caliper and make sure the pads are easily removable. Could be the pad is just stuck on the pin(s) or is corroded and causing excess friction. It's pad on one side and slot on the other. Hell you might get lucky and it just have a rock stuck between the pad plates! Next, collapse the pistons on the rear caliper. I have always used the old pads to do this but whatever you have that will fit in there and allow you to close them. If it moves smoothly then the caliper is probably fine. If you feel things grinding, I would suspect it's got water intrusion and has surface rust on the piston on the inside. Never taken a bird caliper apart but have seen this happen before on other bikes. Normally you would have a leak as it tears seals but it depends on how the caliper is assembled. The rear reservoir cap needs to be off to allow the fluid to easily flow back into the master cylinder during this step, in case you aren't aware. If all that is good, I would replace the rear master cylinder. It's $100 from Ron Ayers and while they do sell rebuild kits for that, I would just buy the entire assembly if it gets to that point. I'm referring to the actual piston part, not everything. Hell, Joe probably has 15 laying around he'll sell you.
  12. 2 points
    Jon has had some success with a high-performance blackbird( gross understatement)
  13. 2 points
    I figured it out and don't know how I missed it. The wires On the back side of the light hosing were coroded and causing a bad connection appreciate the help guys
  14. 1 point
    A tale of three laptops. I was thinking about an SSD for my Dell M6600. It has a 250G hard drive currently, no where near full. I also have an Acer the youngest bricked - no idea what is wrong. Found the Acer power supply and trying to charge it now. I was just looking for a power supply for son no.2's HP g7-2017cl on NewEgg. He abandoned it to me. (I already ordered and received an SSD and battery for it) it powers up. Could use a Win7 CD or similar- ? Then it should upgrade to 10 automatically when MSFT finds it? ...oldest son says put Linux on it. I'd like to install my legal "old" version of AutoCAD. ...built to run mon XP platform. The old Dell 610 @Biometrix sent me has the screen going out finally, but was a real workhorse for many years. Great use Thanks! Can I make Win 10 "run as" XP? I have some small Bluetooth antennae I needed one for my Bose Color II. I got a couple extra if any of you know you need one.
  15. 1 point
    Just to eliminate one possibility (cable binding), trace your throttle cables and then rotate the forks lock-to-lock; there should be no change in the idle rpms. If there is, look for something binding/pinching/etc. the cables, or miss-adjusted cable slack. If there's no fork movement when your idle fluctuates, it's more likely not a cable problem (but double check to be certain). Otherwise, the fast idle circuit and potential intake air leaks would merit close scrutiny.
  16. 1 point
    A 5W LED is gonna make a shit ton more light than 5W incandescent so it's an extremely unfair comparison. Most of my house lights are 6W LED, and they run cooler than the 40 and 60W bulbs they replaced. An LED instrument light is probably less than .5W.
  17. 1 point
    LED should run cooler, not hotter. Lots of people use them for instrument panels and I've never heard of a temperature problem.
  18. 1 point
    Hello, to change the bulbs I only had to remove the dome, the side panels and of the four screws that hold the odometer I removed only the top two, with this you can push the odometer forward one inch and with that to spare to access the bulbs . I changed the big six but I did not put led, I put the same but more watts, the ones I had were 1.7 watts and I have put them 5 watts. So it looks pretty good Just removing the top two screws gives you good access, removing the bottom screws takes more time and really doesn't need to. I think these are still the original ones, 20 years old !! These are the ones that I have put now. This is how my odometer looks now. I am afraid to put them on LEDs because they heat up more and will surely have a shorter duration, although if the good quality purchases are possible that they heat up a little and last a long time, keep in mind that the odometer is always on (here in my country it is mandatory to carry always the light on, so I did not put them on led).
  19. 1 point
  20. 1 point
    Next step was reclearing previously painted platinum and candy blue parts. I used different, higher gloss clear overreduced, so there is no orange peal whatsoever. Not all clearcoats are created equal. UFC35 layes like a glass. BTW, for some reason camera does not show the color correctly.
  21. 1 point
    I'm glad it's in another country.
  22. 1 point
    First coats- I mixed interclear sg100 with some Ice Pearls. Measured by eye, less is usually better in situation like this.
  23. 1 point
    The radiator shop I used growing up would unsolder the tanks and use flat rods to rod the radiator tubes out. I bought a '70 428 Mach I new that always ran hot. When stopped at a light or a train crossing, the dual vacuum advance/retard would run the idle up to 2000 RPM. Finally after a summer run from Louisiana back to the Texas Panhandle, it started blowing steam out of the top tank seam. I took it to Alvin's Radiator to have it repaired, and he said he found 1/3 of the tubes plugged with some strange stuff he had never seen before. He thought the stuff had probably been in there from day one. After he rodded the radiator and reassembled it, that car never overheated again. Running that hot did, however, cause the nylon teeth covering on the timing gears to eventually disintegrate. Luckily the engine wouldn't run, so it didn't plug up the oil pump intake.
  24. 1 point
    Sigh, as soon as I saw 3 pages of posts, I knew this thread was going to be another Jerry Springer episode, staring Tomek and Oscar, and/or Carlos. Sigh. 😔
  25. 1 point
    I’d not trust anything like that beyond short term fixes. Used something similar (not Bar’s), and it held on a cross-country trip. When I flushed the system, the leak returned. Dismounting the radiator and taking it in to be repaired at a local shop was the more permanent fix.
  26. 1 point
    There was a factory recall on a possible seal leak on the LBS proportioning control valve. If fluid could get out, air might get in. The following are the results of a recall search for recalls on the NHTSA Office of Defects Investigation web site. Make / Models : Model/Build Years: HONDA / CBR1100XX 2002-2003 HONDA / ST1300 2003-2004 HONDA / ST1300A 2003-2004 HONDA / VFR800 2002-2004 HONDA / VFR800A 2003-2004 Manufacturer : AMERICAN HONDA MOTOR CO. NHTSA CAMPAIGN ID Number : 05V010000 Recall Date : JAN 18, 2005 Component: SERVICE BRAKES, HYDRAULIC Potential Number Of Units Affected : 36046 Summary: CERTAIN MOTORCYCLES EQUIPPED WITH COMBINED-BRAKE SYSTEMS HAVE A PROPORTIONING CONTROL VALVE (PCV) THAT MECHANICALLY PROPORTIONS BRAKE FORCE WHEN THE REAR BRAKE IS APPLIED. A SEAL IN SOME PCVS IS IMPROPERLY SHAPED, AND BRAKE FLUID LEAKAGE MAY OCCUR. Consequence: IF THE MOTORCYCLE CONTINUES TO BE USED AFTER A LEAK OCCURS, THE REAR BRAKE WOULD EVENTUALLY BECOME INOPERATIVE. A LOSS OF REAR BRAKE FORCE COULD INCREASE THE RISK OF A CRASH. Remedy: DEALERS WILL INSPECT THE REAR BRAKE FORLEAKAGE. IF LEAKAGE IS CONFIRMED, THE DEALER WILL REPLACE THE PCV. THE RECALL IS EXPECTED TO BEGIN ON FEBRUARY 3, 2005. OWNERS SHOULD CONTACT HONDA AT 866-784-1870. Notes: HONDA RECALL NO. P65. CUSTOMERS CAN ALSO CONTACT THE NATIONAL HIGHWAY TRAFFIC SAFETY ADMINISTRATION’S AUTO SAFETY HOTLINE AT 1-888-DASH-2-DOT (1-888-327-4236).
  27. 1 point
    Dude you need your meds checked...
  28. 1 point
    If the front caliper is below the rear reservoir, I'm almost positive it is, it'll work. It's not as far below as the front calipers to front reservoir so it'll be slower, but will still work. Some will say that gravity bleeding doesn't work and that you need pressure or vacuum, but I've been solo bleeding systems using only gravity for a couple decades. Another trick that's handy (especially with LBS and ABS where you REALLY don't want to deal with air intrusion) if you need to remove a hose or caliper, depress the master cylinder piston a little bit and it'll keep the rest of the system from going dry. On a car that means using a bar or something to hold the pedal down a bit. On a bike I use a zip tie to hold the front and a screwdriver or other slim thing to hold the rear pedal down, slip it between the pedal and stop screw or whatever limits the up-travel of the pedal. You don't need to depress the piston enough to make pressure, but if you do it's no biggie, when you first crack the bleeder you'll get a tiny spurt then nothing. In most masters the piston only has to move about 1/8" to block the port, but the lever/pedal travel will be much more than that since they all have a leverage advantage. I usually move it enough to feel a little pressure and that's a guarantee that the port is blocked. I've left systems open for days using this trick and the master was still full. Once the repair is done open the bleed nipple, a beer, then release the caliper piston. Pour fluids as needed, just know that beer isn't good for brakes and DOT4 might fuck with your taste buds so try to not mix them up.
  29. 1 point
    So Ended up getting a pair of SPAL 6.5" fans. I am thinking I should probably use a relay? MFG suggests 13A fuse for one fan but I cant recall OHMs law to figure what they will be in parallel. Opinions? suggestions?
  30. 1 point
    That does not compute
  31. 1 point
    I don`t see this being related to heat handling, if anything, thinner oil flows better and should be able to carry away more heat from the engine. Many major brands have 0w20 race oils, not sure I would wanna use it long term in my bike. Race engines of teams with enough $ get refreshed every 1000-2000 miles or whatever. They can trade increased rebuild intervals for couple hp. https://www.joesracing.com/product/maxima-rs-full-synthetic-oil-0w-20/
  32. 1 point
    Looking good. When do you want me to send you some body panels? 🚴‍♂️
  33. 1 point
    Nose, front fender and sides- orion silver bc 02. Covered in UC35 hok. That is just a base for candy coats. There will be couple more layers of "color" . It is just beginning for those panels. After one coat of metallic.
  34. 1 point
    I just tried and it did lock. I didn't stomp the pedal, but pressed it, and it took a pretty hard press. I think the Gille's pedal gives a little less leverage than the stock pedal does so it may be a little easier on a stocker. I was shocked by how much front brake it applied, it slowed pretty hard.
  35. 1 point
  36. 1 point
    Fronts are available from 12-18 in steel, but most rears are limited in size unless you go aluminum. Aluminum will wear faster. All that to say another vote for -1 up front and ride on.
  37. 1 point
    One of the claimed advantages of a series type regulator is reduced stress on the stator. We shall see.
  38. 1 point
    Well, I’m semi-happy with the results. I’ll take pics later today, but for two openings I used 4 foot t-posts (the green ones) and chicken coop wire. They weren’t easy to install because the area around the inlets are mostly rock. On lesser storms, they caught debris and let the water pass over/around. Saturday, I went out and pulled out the debris that accumulated and for the third culvert where the inlet appears to be part crushed from the driveway paving, I just took a section of chicken coop wire, folded it in half, and fashioned an oval to catch debris without standing higher than the edge of the drive. I checked them this morning after the storms passed through. The two big ones need to be cleaned, repaired and reinforced, BUT they did the job. Enough debris hit the wire to block water flow and collapse the circle of wire I erected, but water flowed around the barrier and entered the drain pipe from the back side. No overflow issues in drainage. PICS...
  39. 1 point
    Ahahahahah!! A horoscope believer. You can't make up shit this funny.
  40. 1 point
    Food fight!!!!!!!!!!!!
  41. 1 point
    A quick update since I saw this thread was on the first page here... Removed the tank a few weeks ago and removed the float, petcock, etc. Filled it with a gallon of muriatic acid, about a gallon of CLR, and 100 stainless #8 X 3/4" screws. Made some interesting vapors, and got pretty hot as I was shaking it. Killed a nice sized patch of my back yard grass as well. But it got the tank pretty clean inside, rust appears to be all gone from where I can see inside. Screws were fairly easy to get out thru the float hole. Rinsed it out for about 30 minutes with a hose just running into it, then dried with acetone and filled with fuel after putting back on the bike. Keeping it completely topped off at all times when parked to hopefully keep the rest from reappearing. there's a gas station 1.1 miles from my house so it's easy to keep the tank full after a ride. Been running great, haven't ridden it much but my wife took it out for a few rides with me and she likes it a lot, says it's very comfortable for her and she likes riding it.
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