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normal operating temp and mpg?


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#1 jeffro7172

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 05:29 PM

my bike regularly sees 210-219 on my work commute and it's 40-50 degrees out. I believe it was in the 220's when I was commuting around LA when I bought it (warmer out) I haven't had it long enough to see what it runs in real heat, but also want to make sure it's not close to overheating either.
Haven't gone through and changed all the fluids yet, but just wondered what you all are seeing on your bikes....2001 FI model by the way.

what is "overheating" temp?
see mpg ?? below

#2 John01XX

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 06:23 PM

The same as my 2001 with over 53,000 miles by the one owner

Those are normal temps - I hit 230 during the summer here in South Florida

#3 jeffro7172

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 06:57 PM

thanks John....puts my mind at ease...what kind of MPG do you get? this last tank I tried to keep from punching it and I got 134 miles out of the tank and crammed 4.8 into it....28 mpg. It's a backroad commute stop and go with a couple stretches of 70 in it. 17 miles each way....just wondering....I know it's probably not the most economical mileage wise but figured mid 30's would be the norm..

#4 cbrxxquad

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Posted 14 January 2010 - 07:53 PM

Thermostat holds it at 205 I believe. Should or it will run lean and wear.
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#5 EVLXX

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 12:01 PM

QUOTE(jeffro7172 @ Jan 14 2010, 11:57 AM) View Post
..what kind of MPG do you get? this last tank I tried to keep from punching it and I got 134 miles out of the tank and crammed 4.8 into it....28 mpg. It's a backroad commute stop and go with a couple stretches of 70 in it. 17 miles each way....just wondering....I know it's probably not the most economical mileage wise but figured mid 30's would be the norm..


Is your bike parked in the sun all day at work ?

That might account for the low mileage number.

#6 jeffro7172

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 02:44 PM

nope underground garage (nice and cool) ...so should city riding be higher mileage?

#7 The Krypt Keeper

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 04:45 PM

I got an 02' and I get alittle over 40mpg being a good little boy and not taking off to hard and keeping it under 70. I normally get high 20's if I am in the mountains playing for extended legnths of time and hardly go under 6k rpm's much..

What all you got done to your bike? How many miles?

might wanna look at your air filter, spark plugs, if you got a PC on your bike might want to disconnect it for a few trips and see if anything changes, or maybe reload your map thats suppose to be in it. Maybe run some seafoam through a couple of tanks. Doubt you need it, but have you ever had the valves checked? Are your brakes dragging any? Just a few things to look at.

Gotta watch critters if you bike sits for a legnth of time, they enjoy making nests. On my old 750 yrs ago I made a list on a notepad for things to do and check for my bike over the winter. Some how the list went missing. I found it a week later while checking my K&N filter. All ripped up and colored red from the oil on the filter. Had me stumped what it was for a second till I saw my writting on a few pieces.

#8 jeffro7172

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 05:04 PM

thanks Krypt Keeper....I will go through and give it a tuneup (which I was planning on anyway) sounds like it'll run even better after that's all done. Bike is stock and prior maint is word of mouth only. It's got 17k miles on it. 40mpg "being a good boy" is a far cry from the 28 I just did on this tank trying to "be a good boy".....

thanks for the replies everyone!

#9 jon haney

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 05:54 PM

Pull the vacuum line off of the fuel pressure regulator(FPR) and check for any fuel. If there is any at all, the regulator needs to be replaced. Bad MPG is an early sign that FPR is going.

#10 tomek

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Posted 15 January 2010 - 11:07 PM

MPG in real city riding sucks when it is cold.In my commute I have a problem getting 30 mpg when temps drop into 30-40 deg range.

On the other hand bike gets mid to upper 40s when cheating .( higher elevation,like,cough,Colorado in the summer).

Actually, I was thinking about it,Ram Air does not help in this area,fuel mixed with cold air has a problem vaporizing.The other thing is oil cooler,XX has actual cooler unlike most of the bikes that are equipped with coolant/oil heat exchanger .Oil system on XX does not have thermostat,it is safe to assume lubricant does not reach optimum temperature when is cold.That increases parasitic losses.

#11 EVLXX

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 02:58 PM

QUOTE(tomek @ Jan 15 2010, 04:07 PM) View Post
MPG in real city riding sucks when it is cold.In my commute I have a problem getting 30 mpg when temps drop into 30-40 deg range.

On the other hand bike gets mid to upper 40s when cheating .( higher elevation,like,cough,Colorado in the summer).

Actually, I was thinking about it,Ram Air does not help in this area,fuel mixed with cold air has a problem vaporizing.The other thing is oil cooler,XX has actual cooler unlike most of the bikes that are equipped with coolant/oil heat exchanger .Oil system on XX does not have thermostat,it is safe to assume lubricant does not reach optimum temperature when is cold.That increases parasitic losses.


icon_lol.gif

Yep that's it, just move to Colorado and you'll magically get better gas mileage. bduh.gif

...

Now as for the second part.... BAM ! ... Right on the Money. Good Point.

#12 01xxallen

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 07:17 PM

QUOTE(EVLXX @ Jan 16 2010, 09:58 AM) View Post
Yep that's it, just move to Colorado and you'll magically get better gas mileage. bduh.gif

All my bikes get better MPG in Colorado. I can't explain it. Even with F/I.
So less air would make the bike get less fuel, but then you just twist the throttle a bit more so you should be back where you started.
But it doesn't work that way. Less moisture in the air?
My H/D gets 50 mpg when in Co.


#13 XX_Rider

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 08:18 PM

It's simple the higher up you are the less Oxygen in the air, the bike puts less fuel in because there is less Oxygen. Gives you better MPG but less HP. For example on a dyno at sea level your XX makes 130HP. If you dyno your bike at 5000 feet you'd get about 20HP less. Most dyno's correct the HP reading to sea level BUT doesn't change that your bike made 20 less HP. Since you make less HP you need less fuel to make it.

My XX was getting between 30-35MPG highway before I had it dyno tuned. After the custom map I was getting 40-45MPG at 140Km/h (85MPH). Keep in mind this is just at cruising speed and all highway(and +1T on the front sprocket).

Before the tune on the highway 310Km was my MAX on a tank(digital dash and gas light flashed for at least 50-60Km) and when I pulled in for gas it was on fumes. After the tune the same 310Km stretch(no other changes) I still had more than 1/4 tank showing on the gauge. Both trips were made with full Givi luggage and the same gear/supplies on the bike.

#14 cbrxxquad

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Posted 16 January 2010 - 10:03 PM

I know the 2000 has a barometer sensor, but the 2002 does not. so. M.a.p. is the only way it can adjust fuel quantity.

#15 tomek

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 01:57 AM

QUOTE(EVLXX @ Jan 16 2010, 08:58 AM) View Post
QUOTE(tomek @ Jan 15 2010, 04:07 PM) View Post
MPG in real city riding sucks when it is cold.In my commute I have a problem getting 30 mpg when temps drop into 30-40 deg range.

On the other hand bike gets mid to upper 40s when cheating .( higher elevation,like,cough,Colorado in the summer).

Actually, I was thinking about it,Ram Air does not help in this area,fuel mixed with cold air has a problem vaporizing.The other thing is oil cooler,XX has actual cooler unlike most of the bikes that are equipped with coolant/oil heat exchanger .Oil system on XX does not have thermostat,it is safe to assume lubricant does not reach optimum temperature when is cold.That increases parasitic losses.


icon_lol.gif

Yep that's it, just move to Colorado and you'll magically get better gas mileage. bduh.gif

...




Yes,you do .The air is simply thinner,less aero drag.Motorcycles have,relatively speaking,barn door`s aerodynamics,that is way MPG improvement is really noticeable,about 15-20% in my case.
Even in the car I would typically get 10% MPG improvement in mile high states like Colo,or Wyoming.

If look at performance date for the airplanes with turbocharged piston engines that can maintain absolute manifold pressure( and consequently hp) to really high elevation like WW2`s P47 or P38 you would notice that their top speed at,let`s 25000 feet, is about 80-100 mph higher then at sea level.360-370 vs.440-460mph.
Same with fuel consumption,planes burn more fuel at lower elevations.

That is why comparing MPGs without mentioning elevation is not really accurate,or cheating. icon_twisted.gif


#16 BackStreet

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 03:10 AM

QUOTE(jeffro7172 @ Jan 14 2010, 12:29 PM) View Post
my bike regularly sees 210-219 on my work commute and it's 40-50 degrees out. I believe it was in the 220's when I was commuting around LA when I bought it (warmer out) I haven't had it long enough to see what it runs in real heat, but also want to make sure it's not close to overheating either.
Haven't gone through and changed all the fluids yet, but just wondered what you all are seeing on your bikes....2001 FI model by the way.

what is "overheating" temp?
see mpg ?? below


I would try Engine Ice or Redline Water Wetter and water to keep the engine running cooler as long as the temp does not go below freezing (add antifreeze as needed). Your temp while moving will come down to 180-185. My thermostat opens at about 182. At start up I'll see the temp build to 182 and drop a few times as the cold mix in the radiator gets into the engine the first few times. I run 50/50 plus 1/2 bottle of Water Wetter. At speeds over 50mph when the temp is around 50F my temp will stay in the 180-185 range. In traffic, at 222 or so the fans comes on and it shuts off at 210. I try and keep moving and normally my fans do not come on.

PS: I good thing about synthetic oil is the viscosity stays more consistent over a wider temperature range.

#17 01xxallen

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 05:17 AM

QUOTE(XX_Rider @ Jan 16 2010, 03:18 PM) View Post
It's simple the higher up you are the less Oxygen in the air, the bike puts less fuel in because there is less Oxygen. Gives you better MPG but less HP. For example on a dyno at sea level your XX makes 130HP. If you dyno your bike at 5000 feet you'd get about 20HP less. Most dyno's correct the HP reading to sea level BUT doesn't change that your bike made 20 less HP. Since you make less HP you need less fuel to make it.

But..............
Let's say at sea level it takes 30 hp. to maintain 60 mph level.
So now you go to 10,000' you make less hp. Right? So you can't maintain 60 mph. (at a given throttle setting)

The answer is to twist the throttle to add more fuel/air to get back to 30 hp. & 60 mph.

So shouldn't you get the same mileage as at sea level?

I'm missing something. And I think it's the density of the air, not the volume.

I actually think the bike F/I, runs better at altitude, sounds smoother, happier.
I know it's nuts.


As far as temp. My fan doesn't even kick on until 219 F.


#18 blackhawkxx

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 05:31 AM

Can't you put in a lower temp thermostat like we have done was cars forever? I never hear of people doing that with bikes.

#19 01xxallen

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 03:06 PM

QUOTE(jeffro7172 @ Jan 14 2010, 12:29 PM) View Post
my bike regularly sees 210-219 on my work commute and it's 40-50 degrees out. I believe it was in the 220's when I was commuting around LA when I bought it

Also remember that the bird doesn't pump enough water to cool the engine if you are below 4000 rpm. At stoplights, the temp soars. Kick it up to 4 K in traffic and it helps.


#20 cbrxxquad

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Posted 17 January 2010 - 03:09 PM

Manifold Absolute pressure sensor, map sensor, gauges the airbox pressure, and sets the amount of time the injectors are open. Air fuel ratios are the same, air densities the bike passes through are different. Thick air resist the bike more than thin air. Bikes are bricks compaired to other vehicles. Drag coefficient higher.

Unless engine temp is 212 condensate will accumulate in the oil and reduce lubricity of the oil and drag internal parts, hence wear and higher parasitic losses.

Fuel contacting the cylinder at lower temps condensates to a liquid and will not mix with air or burn quickly, leaning the mixture and diluting the oil film on the walls causing the rings to contact metal to metal and wearing both. More parasitic drag.


That is why engine temps are like they are. Even higher are even better. Until oil breakdown, higher is better. Check out Smokey Yunicky's exhaust heated engine intakes that make 300 hp from twin cylinder engines.
http://smokeyyunick.com/





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