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This is just out here for you guys that looking for something to stimulate your brains. Please ignore otherwise.

 

Have a friend, Ian, that lives in Hong kong. He also has a museum with a lot of old bikes in ireland. He has two cbxs. He is currently in Hong kong. Is cbx that is in Ireland is frying stators. A couple if youoribably know him. He's done a lot for the CBX community and owns a Blackbird 

 

It took him three tries to successfully install his dyna-ignition in the HK CBX. Now the first one that has been installed in Ireland is melting shit.

 

I went to the CBX forum. It's pretty quiet over there. He's trying to do group diagnosis on via FB.

 

 

Screenshot_20220827-111814_Chrome.jpg

Screenshot_20220827-111659_Chrome.jpg

Edited by XXitanium
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That looks like an internal failure in the coil to me.  What does the inside of the spark unit look like?  If it's just simple connections, then the voltage is carrying straight through (but there may be evidence of overheating.)  It may look like that Dyna at this point though.  That appears to be a ton of voltage causing snap-crackle-pop.

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Not an expert, but my thought (as the guy has some coin) is knock up a test bench and submit the part to normal operating conditions and see if it fails on it’s own.  If it doesn’t, something on the bike is frying it.  He really needs to isolate inputs and outputs to see if they are in spec (if he can find out the specs)…which might be tougher to do when mounted to the bike.

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If my guess is correct (internal failure of the coil back-feeding through the spark unit and frying the Dyna) then I would just parts cannon it.  Because I'm not talking about 12 volts, I'm talking about however much voltage is being sent to the spark plug.  I don't know what those coils are rated at but if it's back-feeding that voltage, I know I wouldn't want my hands anywhere near it.  That's a lot of voltage instantaneously that hit that, not a "slow" burn, because the wiring is not burnt leading to that section.  It found the weakest link and it found it FAST.  I would ohm out all the related ignition wiring, internally inspect the spark unit or replace with known good, replace that coil (or all coils personally because if one is taking a dump and they're all the same age...), new Dyna, new plugs, new plug wires, verify install and timing, and ride out.  This is a 40+ year old bike... unless it's a 100 point restoration and you're Jay Leno, it's time for that factory stuff to go bye-bye.  My KZ1000 drag bike that I built in 1996 is STILL racing on the Dyna ignition, coils, and wires I put on it in 1996 with the current owner and it sat in my parents garage for almost 15 years.

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It's CBX vs KZ though, so I don't know what that spark unit does.  That's why I'm asking about the spark unit.  If something fishy is going on inside that you could have a short.  If I had better pictures I could tell better.  But I don't see anything else burned up or any damage to the wiring leading to it (that gray cable looks pristine in that zoomed in photo.)

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Without looking, I would lay money that it is a problem with the 12v charging system. When i get home I'll look at the manual pages posted.

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5 hours ago, Furbird said:

This is ignition, NOT stator.  I think Mike only read the first couple of lines and replied (where you incorrectly typed "stator"). 

No, I understood. While I would expect a spike in 12v supply to be most likely on most bikes, I see that the CBX has a field coil regulated alternator. Unlike the RR unit of the XX and most sport bikes, these are far less likely to spike intermittently. A failure in this type of system would far more likely be zero output.

 

Now if the problem is in the same location each time, then I would agree with furbird that the HV is in fact hitting the ignition module and killing it.

The trick to recognize is that the HV is not capable of melting the unit, but only causing the failure which then allows the 12v to flow continuously and burn it.

 

The HV fault will be hard to prove in most cases, sometimes it can be seen as a crack leading from the HV lead back to a terminal. But it could be internal as well.

 

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