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silverbird1100

Who's replacing their oem brake lines?

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3 hours ago, Zero Knievel said:

Seemed anemic...like there was air in the system, but there wasn't.  It just worked more effectively.

That's a shocking amount of WTF? even for you.

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13 hours ago, superhawk996 said:

That's a shocking amount of WTF? even for you.

 

I can only describe how it felt to me.  Working the clutch felt like there was practically no resistance.  However it worked perfectly.  Maybe my OEM line desperately needed replacing.  I don’t know.

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OK I am convinced, I will spend time trying to bleed off air another way, thanks for all the advice.

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If you're trying to bleed out air on the kickstand that'll be a problem since the bleeder will be at the low end of the slave cylinder--from memory of where the bleed nipple is located.

 

I don't know what it is about clutches, but many have troubles bleeding them, and not just on bikes.  The most troublesome on I recall was a forklift way back in my learning days.  I've since had no problem on any vehicle despite 'everyone' saying that the only way is to back-bleed with a pump.  The only thing I think I do that is different from other people is paying attention to angles and working with gravity.  I'm also careful not to let the master go dry when opening shit downstream so the master doesn't have to be bled.

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On 9/5/2019 at 9:21 AM, superhawk996 said:

I don't know what it is about clutches, but many have troubles bleeding them, and not just on bikes.

I think that it might have something to do with not being able to pump up a lot of force like a brake pedal but not really sure.

Edited by blackhawkxx

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10 hours ago, blackhawkxx said:

I think that it might have something to do with not being able to pump up a lot of force like a brake peddle but not really sure.

 

I've not had an issue on the XX.  If you keep pumping fluid through, all the air eventually comes out.

 

Now, my B3000, the clutch master cylinder is at an angle, so an air bubble can remain trapped in the master cylinder.  THAT was a pain to get all the air out.

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The pressure doesn't matter, I gravity bleed 99% of the time.

 

Angles of shit definitely matters.  I'll park on ramps or blocks, or jack the vehicle as needed.  The 'trick' to bleeding a master is to angle it so that the inlet port of the cylinder from the reservoir is a little higher than the outlet/pressure end, this lets bubbles in the cylinder rise into the reservoir.  With a cage that sometimes means lifting the rear of the vehicle, on most bikes just turning the bars will angle the master.  Angle also matters on calipers & clutch slaves.  Most calipers & wheel cylinders are mounted so that the bleed nipple is at the top and nothing needs to be done, but if the vehicle is on an angle it might not be.  Bike clutch slaves may require you to tilt the bike to get the nipple at the highest point.

 

Whenever you're opening the system like to replace a hose or caliper, if you push the master piston in a bit it'll block the fluid in the reservoir so you won't have as much mess and won't have an air locked master.  A zip tie or similar works great for front brakes/clutches.  For the rear brake I just put something between the pedal and stopper if it has one, or wedge something wherever it'll work, or hang something from the pedal to keep it down.  With cars I generally use a prybar or whatever between the front of the seat and pedal.  The piston doesn't have to be moved much to block the inlet port, 1/8" or so should do it, but more is fine.  If you put pressure on the piston be aware that when you first crack something open you'll get a little squirt.

 

When doing just a fluid exchange all you have to do is open bleeders and let gravity move the fluid through, if you wanna speed it up you can pump the master.  

 

I've been solo bleeding for over 20 years with no 'special' stuff like pressure bleeders or check valves, it's easy once you understand the system and pay attention to the angles of stuff.

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