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This truck has been very good to me - but I’ve bought something newer and need to find it a good home.

 

1999 F-250 7.3L - 4x4 Lariat Crew Cab. All stock, 368k flawless miles. Lots of recent parts - new glow plugs and glow plug relays, new rotors and pads, new front calipers etc. Pulls my 8k lbs trailer like a champ and gets better fuel economy than my new Cummins. 

 

All major systems work perfectly  but does need a few very minor things - most major is the factory radio is junk. Drivers side window tint needs redone, overhead temp/compass is inop (there is a service on EBay fixing these for $25 including shipping - just never pulled it out). Factory leather seats in the front were pretty bad - I put nice seat covers on it and never looked back. Dash is perfect. Has bedliner. Good tires too.

 

pics taken this morning.

 

Asking $8k. Might consider interesting trades.

 

42D82C97-060A-4A26-B970-112D31578E36.thumb.jpeg.50e7411d701a1e970c854cfcd3d0816b.jpeg

 

78493664-E2D5-4557-ADCB-4F899396F7A9.jpeg

Edited by racer212

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5 minutes ago, DBLXX said:

That's a beautiful truck...and I love the color.

 

GLWS !

 

Love it - she’s never let me down. I just got the bug for something different. I love the new truck, but sometimes when I take this one out I find little things I like better in the old one.

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46 minutes ago, racer212 said:

I love the new truck, but sometimes when I take this one out I find little things I like better in the old one.

It's the same way with wives. :o

 

Good luck with the sale, sounds like the truck has been dead reliable for you. Hilarious how in the 70s and 80s everyone threw away their car when it approached 100K miles. Bet that Power Stroke hits 500K miles easily.

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55 minutes ago, TOXXIC said:

It's the same way with wives. :o

 

Good luck with the sale, sounds like the truck has been dead reliable for you. Hilarious how in the 70s and 80s everyone threw away their car when it approached 100K miles. Bet that Power Stroke hits 500K miles easily.

 

No doubt in my mind. I’ve two friends that have greater than 800k on theirs.

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WOW! Never heard of them getting that high. Impressive! Gives me hope for my Duramax.

Edited by TOXXIC

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22 minutes ago, TOXXIC said:

WOW! Never heard of them getting that high. Impressive! Gives me hope for my Duramax.

 

Theres on 01 on the Powerstroke claiming 1.3 million on stock bottom end and trans. The 7.3 is a crazy reliable engine.

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It's everything AFTER the 7.3 that blows up.  And I do mean everything.  Even so called bulletproof 6.0's still lift heads.  One of my rebuilders buys every single 7.3 Excursion that goes through the auction.  He's got them sold before he even finishes them.

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9 hours ago, Furbird said:

It's everything AFTER the 7.3 that blows up.  And I do mean everything

I think your claim is a little blown up.  ;)

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13 hours ago, Furbird said:

It's everything AFTER the 7.3 that blows up.  And I do mean everything.  Even so called bulletproof 6.0's still lift heads.  One of my rebuilders buys every single 7.3 Excursion that goes through the auction.  He's got them sold before he even finishes them.

 

All that said - a stock 7.3 doesn't make near the power of a 6.4 or 6.7... as the expense of reliability I suppose.

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On 1/29/2018 at 8:02 PM, Furbird said:

Even so called bulletproof 6.0's still lift heads.

With a hot rod tune making the motor put out WAY more than it was designed to.

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On 1/29/2018 at 5:29 PM, racer212 said:

 

Theres on 01 on the Powerstroke claiming 1.3 million on stock bottom end and trans. The 7.3 is a crazy reliable engine.

Stock trans is extremely shocking, they aren't known to be all that great.  If it's been babied I guess it's possible.

 

If I had 8k laying around I'd be giving yours some serious thoughts.

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My 7.3L had a fifth wheel hitch in it before I bought it and it is set up for plowing. I rebuilt the transmission at about 180,000 miles. I'm at 250,000 now. The previous owner had a tuner in it. He took it out before he traded it in. He found me and tried to sell it to me.

 

The dealer I bought it from did some fuel/injector rail work before I bought it. I suspect the damage was from the tuner chip. 

 

The 6.7L is supposed to be quite reliable too now my understanding. I also hang out at TheDeiselStop.com on occasion..

 

 

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Tunning diesel via software is retarded and indicates Otto Cycle ( gasoline engine ) way of thinking .

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2 hours ago, tomek said:

Tunning diesel via software is retarded and indicates Otto Cycle ( gasoline engine ) way of thinking .

 

Are there alternatives to tune a modern Diesel that is digitally controlled?  Wouldn't the existing stock software try to work against any mechanical mods one makes to attempt to bring it back into the stock parameters?  If you increased injector size, FP, or mechanically altered boost pressure, wouldn't the software read the additional fuel flow or boost pressure and try to "correct" it?  

 

I've never done any sort of performance tuning on a Diesel - a computer-controlled one or not - so I have no idea - but since I find myself thinking about Diesels a lot lately, I'd like to hear your thoughts on alternatives to performance modification software. 

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I`m sorry but I was not specific enough . Tunning   by modifying mapping and not doing mechanical modes  is asking for disaster in diesels. In case of port injected gasoline engines injection timing and duration do not matter that much. I mean there used to be batch injected engines. You can increase boost and injectors duty cycle and it will kinda work for 20-30 % peak torque increase. Less on top end since stock turbos get chocked in upper regions of rpm band. 

That is not the case with diesels. In diesel fuels gets ignited and burns as is being injected into combustion chamber.  That is why extending injection period is not so good. It is like retarding timing on gasoline engine. You get increased EGT, incomplete burn, oil diluted by fuel and other nasty things. 

 

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5 hours ago, tomek said:

Tunning   by modifying mapping and not doing mechanical modes  is asking for disaster in diesels.

What mechanical mods? I’ve been running a 90HP tuner on a stock Duramax diesel for the last 100K miles, no disasters. Stock exhaust, only other “mechanical mod” is a cold air intake. Truck is a 2002 Chevy with the LB7.

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5 hours ago, tomek said:

I`m sorry but I was not specific enough . Tunning   by modifying mapping and not doing mechanical modes  is asking for disaster in diesels. In case of port injected gasoline engines injection timing and duration do not matter that much. I mean there used to be batch injected engines. You can increase boost and injectors duty cycle and it will kinda work for 20-30 % peak torque increase. Less on top end since stock turbos get chocked in upper regions of rpm band. 

That is not the case with diesels. In diesel fuels gets ignited and burns as is being injected into combustion chamber.  That is why extending injection period is not so good. It is like retarding timing on gasoline engine. You get increased EGT, incomplete burn, oil diluted by fuel and other nasty things. 

 

 

I know that just slapping on a wild map without doing the reinforcement necessary to handle the additional stresses is risky, at best.  What mechanical mods should be done prior to adding modest levels of boost and increasing fueling?  I can guess at head studs, maybe head gaskets... I know that's a very open-ended question, and dependent on what one starts with as a base motor and how they define "modest - but what are some common ones?   Keeping it simple and staying on the motor, not the driveline and tires :P

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You can't just slap a tuner on a diesel is just like saying you can't just slap nitrous on a stock gas motor.  Every HP you add is more stress and there are upper limits where you break shit quickly.

 

I ran 150ish (probably more) HP of nitrous on a stock Ford 5.0 in my '95 Mustang Cobra.  120HP on a stock 454 HiPo in a jet boat.  120 HP on a stock 351C in my '73 Mustang.  None of the engines suffered noticeable damage.

 

Diesel tuners are in many ways a lot like nitrous.  There's an entry fee to buy it then it's up to you how far you push it.  Push too far and you'll get shrapnel.

 

Anyone making the blanket statement that putting a tuner on a diesel is retarded is ignorant.  In many cases a tuner fixes problems instead of creating them.

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On 2/2/2018 at 5:37 AM, tomek said:

Tunning diesel via software is retarded and indicates Otto Cycle ( gasoline engine ) way of thinking .

Exactly how does it indicate that?

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6 hours ago, superhawk996 said:

Exactly how does it indicate that?

Read my other post in this thread.

 

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Ah, ok.  So you're simply mistaken.  While some tuners do that, they don't all do that.  I imagine "smoke" tunes probably do.  Fortunately the fad of rolling coal seems to have mostly died.  Some of the things some tuners do: raise the injection pressure to get more fuel in more quickly, advance the injection timing, remove the fueling delay so the turbo spools up more quickly, raise the boost limit, raise the RPM cut off, raise the EGT limit, change shift points, change the shift pressure for tighter engagement, alter/disable EGR function.....

 

In many cases a tuner can extend engine and transmission life.  If one decides to tune his engine into a top fuel dragster then it's probably gonna be short lived.  The problem with tuners is similar to that of nitrous, once you buy the package you can go from mild to wild for 0$.  Motors blow up and the device gets the blame instead of the person who got greedy.

 

I've got at least 600 miles of driving my buddy's 7.3 at different tune levels and many thousand miles driving stockers.  The biggest impact is the removal of the power delay when you first step on it.  The factory tune keeps the air/fuel ratio lean & clean so when you step on it it adds a little fuel and waits for the turbo to give it air, and the two slowly come up together.  The tune lets it fuel quickly to make power right away, which of course spools the turbo more quickly.  In stock form there's a slow build up of power when you step on the pedal, when tuned it acts more like a gasser where it responds instantly to pedal input.  Less of an issue with later model diesels having multi turbos/variable vane turbos, but they still do the clean burn thing so there's still a delay in response.  This brief rich condition is bad for emissions but does no real harm to the motor.  Generally speaking, if a diesel ain't smoking there's little chance of it being damaged by over fueling/late fueling.

 

If I had an electronic diesel I'd research the shit out of which tuner is best for my vehicle and get that one.  I would then monitor everything to make sure it's not doing something retarded.  A buddy has a Diablo on his 6.4 and I'm sure it's going to kill the thing.  He loves the power and the fact that it no longer regens, which also "proves" to him that the engine is running better and going to last longer.  It's common knowledge that regen puts fuel into the oil and is what kills a 6.4  The amount of fuel in his oil proves to me that it's going to die sooner than it should.  When I told him he had over a gallon of fuel in his oil, which it wasn't doing when it was stock, he said "but it doesn't regen any more".  Because it doesn't regen his brain is stuck on 'it can't have fuel dilution' even tho I showed him.  When I did his oil change it was at least a gallon over-filled and he hadn't added any oil.  It's about due for another change, I pulled the stick last week and it's over full again with 0 added.  I can't tell exactly how far over it is because the fuel/oil blend doesn't stick to the stick.  If I were letting him run the factory OCI it would probably be dead already.  Ford recommends 10k, I'm doing them at 5K.

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Superhawk996  - thank you for that. That was a great write up. When I bought mine I wouldn't have understood quite a bit of that. I didn't realize tuners interacted with that much of the controls. The dealer mentioned what they had to fix and implied it was related to being tuned. I never researched it further. I have been pretty happy with stock. 

 

I test drove a stock 6.0 once and was pretty impressed by it's hill climbing ability. I have been leary of them for their questionable reputations.

 

Question - diesels that are run fifty miles at a time Vs 12 mikes at a time (or pick an appropriate interval) if you run them for longer distances per trip, is there less of a problem with fuel in the oil?

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21 hours ago, XXitanium said:

 

 

Question - diesels that are run fifty miles at a time Vs 12 mikes at a time (or pick an appropriate interval) if you run them for longer distances per trip, is there less of a problem with fuel in the oil?

Probably.  A cold motor is likely to create more junk that gets caught in the DPF necessitating more regen cycles.  My guess, don't really know.

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...old 7.3L - no regen, but I'm guessing warming them up gasifies the fuel a little at a time also. That should cook it out.

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