Jump to content
CBR1100XX.org Forum
Boov

Rear Axle Nut, How Tight?

Recommended Posts

Years ago someone had told me that you couldn't get the rear axle nut too tight (within reason). In other words, the tighter the better.

Well, I spun the threads out of mine, destroying the nut and the axle.

So, I have two questions:

What is the Honda torque spec?

How tight do you put yours?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think factory spec is 68 lbs.

Mine's kept tight...I have custom wheels that came with aluminum spacers and was supposed to use half the factory amount on the nut. I machined all new spacers out of SS so I could use the full factory tq setting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

69 ft lbs.

I suggest you torque to 65 ft lbs, then take a wrench and turn the nut a little more....just enough to know that you did. That "re-teaches" how much to tighten the axle if you don't have a torque wrench the next time.

All that overtightening does is stretch the threads and place the assembly that much closer to failure. How do these mechanical "old wive's tales" perpetuate, and why do people tend to blindly believe them?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Joe, as you know, I can tell you why these wives tails perpetuate...

Thanks again for letting me borrow your axle for my ride home from SeXXt, by the way!

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I just go as tight as I can manage with one hand. That's pretty tight...it also ensures that in the field I am able to undo what I did. Never had it work lose. There's something about that nut they give you that seems to have locking properties. It resists coming loose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just go as tight as I can manage with one hand. That's pretty tight...it also ensures that in the field I am able to undo what I did. Never had it work lose. There's something about that nut they give you that seems to have locking properties. It resists coming loose.

Yeah, that's how I tightened it, too... That's also how I galled the threads and had to take it to a shop in E-TN for them to have to impact it off, after about 3 hours of trying... Of course, they galled halfway off, so it wouldn't come off, but wasn't tight, either... That ended up being about a $300 mistake, not counting the missed 2 days of riding in E-TN...

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's something about that nut they give you that seems to have locking properties. It resists coming loose.

LOL, yeah, it's a lock nut, that's the "something about it". Not coming loose however, does not equal proper torque.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
I just go as tight as I can manage with one hand. That's pretty tight...it also ensures that in the field I am able to undo what I did. Never had it work lose. There's something about that nut they give you that seems to have locking properties. It resists coming loose.

This was my typical tightening strategy too, and maybe this wasn't entierly from being too tight. The first time I turned this nut after buying the bike was to replace the back tire. It took me 10 minutes to get it off, and I definitely rolled some of the threads out. I should have gotten a new axle then, but I'm way too dutch to but something before I absolutely need it.

Typically you keep a fastener from galling by lubricating it. Would you dare to give the threads a drop of oil?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's something about that nut they give you that seems to have locking properties. It resists coming loose.

LOL, yeah, it's a lock nut, that's the "something about it". Not coming loose however, does not equal proper torque.

True, but until someone makes an affordable torque wrench that you can break down and fit into a MC tool kit....

I've seen lock nuts with the nylon rings, but I'm not sure how the one on the rear axle works. It has this odd metal feature on it, but I can't see what it does that keeps it from working loose.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's something about that nut they give you that seems to have locking properties. It resists coming loose.

LOL, yeah, it's a lock nut, that's the "something about it". Not coming loose however, does not equal proper torque.

True, but until someone makes an affordable torque wrench that you can break down and fit into a MC tool kit....

I've seen lock nuts with the nylon rings, but I'm not sure how the one on the rear axle works. It has this odd metal feature on it, but I can't see what it does that keeps it from working loose.

It acts like a spring and keeps tension on the threads which keeps it from vibrating loose. This is better than nylon for high heat applications or where you will be removing the nut regularly, but.........you got to lubricate the threads to keep it from galling, especially right before you remove it. WD-40 works great. I messed up the threads on my drag-bike, but not too bad. After a little thread-file action, I found a crown nut and then drilled a hole for a cotter pin. Problem solved.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
There's something about that nut they give you that seems to have locking properties. It resists coming loose.

LOL, yeah, it's a lock nut, that's the "something about it". Not coming loose however, does not equal proper torque.

True, but until someone makes an affordable torque wrench that you can break down and fit into a MC tool kit....

I've seen lock nuts with the nylon rings, but I'm not sure how the one on the rear axle works. It has this odd metal feature on it, but I can't see what it does that keeps it from working loose.

If you pack like a cool bohemian gypsy there are plenty of places to put the damn thing..... I carry mine with me on all my long trips, along with the required sockets. Also there are bungy cords and PVC pipe. The coolest way to carry it is in a holster like you use for Maglites.

I belive there is a RAM mount being developed for them.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Why dont you just look in the shop manual, it has all the torque values !! Its so easy, rather than guessing.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
True, but until someone makes an affordable torque wrench that you can break down and fit into a MC tool kit....

Aren't you the guy who said two 36 liter bags wasn't enough room for a road trip? What do you run, a couple 46's and a top box, and there's no room for a torque wrench?

But to be honest, I don't travel with one and rarely use one for wheels and other common maintenance items. As Joe kinda said earlier, you can get a feel for this stuff with a little experience, knock on wood ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just for the record, the proper torque on any nut or bolt is really easy to do without a torque wrench and should be used even if you have one.

No more than a quarter turn after seated.

Learn it.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×